Eatock Primary School

Telephone:

01942 634672

Where to find us?

St George's Ave, Westhoughton BL5 2ER

Eatock Primary School

Telephone:

01942 634672

St George's Avenue

Westhoughton BL5 2ER

Pupil Premium

Top 3% of all Schools

Your school results show that your school is amongst the top 3% of all schools in England in terms of progress. We want to ensure that every child has the necessary fluency in reading, writing and mathematics and your school has provided this.

Nick Gibb

Minister of State School Standards

5.0
2016-03-14T15:19:08+00:00

Nick Gibb

Minister of State School Standards

Your school results show that your school is amongst the top 3% of all schools in England in terms of progress. We want to ensure that every child has the necessary fluency in reading, writing and mathematics and your school has provided this.

Inspiring Place

Eatock is an inspiring place for pupils to learn and lives up to its motto of: 'Giving wings to fly'.

Sue Eastwood

HMI Ofsted Inspector

5.0
2016-03-14T15:19:18+00:00

Sue Eastwood

HMI Ofsted Inspector

Eatock is an inspiring place for pupils to learn and lives up to its motto of: ‘Giving wings to fly’.

Awesome and Safe

Pupils think the school is 'awesome' and feel very safe: Parents agree.

Sue Eastwood

HMI Ofsted Inspsector

5.0
2017-08-23T10:51:02+00:00

Sue Eastwood

HMI Ofsted Inspsector

Pupils think the school is ‘awesome’ and feel very safe: Parents agree.

Truly Inspired

Truly inspired every time I come. The teachers and the creative learning our children is amazing.

Parent

February 2017

5.0
2017-08-23T10:52:50+00:00

Parent

February 2017

Truly inspired every time I come. The teachers and the creative learning our children is amazing.

Excellent Practice

The school's excellent practise in teaching and learning is valued highly by the local authority and, as a result, the school is asked to share its expertise with other schools. The school plays a full part within a network of schools

Ofsted Report

June 2016

 

5.0
2017-08-23T10:55:26+00:00

Ofsted Report

June 2016

 

The school’s excellent practise in teaching and learning is valued highly by the local authority and, as a result, the […]
5.0
5

Pupil Premium Grant (PPG) 2019-20: Allocation, Use and Impact

Some Background Information from the Department for Education

 

Purpose

  • The Government believes that the Pupil Premium Grant, which is additional to main school funding, is the best way to address the current underlying inequalities between children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and their wealthier peers by ensuring that funding to tackle disadvantage reaches the pupils who need it most.
  • In most cases the Pupil Premium Grant is allocated to schools and is clearly identifiable. It is for schools to decide how the Pupil Premium funding, allocated to schools per FSM pupil, is spent, since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the individual pupils within their responsibility.
  • For pupils from low-income families in non-mainstream settings, it is for the local authority to decide how to allocate the Pupil Premium. For instance it could be allocated to the setting where they are being educated, or held by the local authority to spend specifically on additional educational support to raise the standard of attainment for these pupils. The authority must consult non-mainstream settings about how the Premium for these pupils should be used.
  • Schools are free to spend the Pupil Premium Grant as they see fit. However schools are held accountable for how they have used the additional funding to support pupils from low-income families. Government performance tables highlight the achievement of those disadvantaged pupils covered by the Pupil Premium. There is a requirement that schools publish the progress and attainment of the disadvantaged pupils online and how they have used the Premium. This is to ensure that parents and others are made fully aware of the progress and attainment of pupils covered by the Premium.

Key facts

  • The Pupil Premium is allocated to children from low-income families who are currently known to be eligible for FSM in both mainstream and non-mainstream settings and children who have been looked after continuously for more than six months.
  • The level of the premium in 2019-20 is £1,320 per pupil for pupils eligible for free school meals (FSM) and £1,900 for pupils in care who have been continuously looked after for six months.
  • Local authorities are responsible for looked after children in care and will make payments to schools and academies where an eligible looked after child is on roll.
  • The Government decided that eligibility for the Pupil Premium Grant in 2012-13 was extended to pupils who have been eligible for free school meals (FSM) at any point in the last 6 years (Forever6). As a group, children who have been eligible for FSM at any point in time have consistently lower educational attainment than those who have never been eligible for FSM.

Service Premium

  • In 2014 a grant introduced for children whose parents are currently serving in the armed services. This service premium is designed to address the emotional and social well-being of these pupils.

 

At Eatock, 20% of pupils are identified as ‘disadvantaged’ and in receipt of the Pupil Premium funding. This percentage is lower than the national percentage.

The Pupil Premium payment comes into the school budget in April. In April 2019, the school received £70,308. Pupils who are classed as ‘disadvantaged’ tend to perform less well than others, but at Eatock, we have a strong focus on ensuring the differences are much smaller than the national picture. Indeed, the percentage of disadvantaged pupils at Eatock, attaining the national standard and above in 2019, was higher than similar schools nationally, in the Year 1 Phonics Screening test, at the end of Key Stage 1 and end of Key Stage 2.

Allocation: £70,308

 

Key barriers to educational achievement

  • Lack of cultural capital
  • Poor language and literacy( reading and writing )skills
  • Social and emotional needs
  • Gaps in general knowledge and skills
  • Issues with attendance and punctuality

 

Spending 2019-20

The PPG is spent on addressing the identified barriers to learning and achievement faced by the eligible pupils in school. Our rationale for PPG spending is based on our understanding of the importance of building cultural capital ( building knowledge and readiness for life and learning ) language and literacy skills and addressing social and emotional needs and gaps in knowledge and skills to ensure pupils eligible for PPG achieve success in school and in later life.

We want them to acquire an understanding of the world around them, an understanding of how life works and a language to explain it.

 

In order to address the identified barriers, the focus of spending will be:

  • Building cultural capital ( e.g. High focus on ensuring disadvantaged pupils have high expectations for themselves and for what they can achieve, cultural trips and visits strategically planned, extra curricular clubs including Homework club, curriculum design and enrichment, investment in resourcing the learning environment and resources and focus on building knowledge and readiness for learning )
  • Designated staff meetings with the progress and well being of pupils eligible for PPG a key focus
  • Early intervention with a focus on language development and literacy.
  • High curriculum focus on the development of reading and oracy skills
  • Investment in the ‘Volunteer Reader’ scheme
  • Investment in quality texts and visiting storytellers/poets and resources to support the development of reading and oracy
  • Implementing an individualised approach to addressing barriers to learning and emotional support
  • Investment in resources to support early language development and social skills
  • Individualised approach to addressing barriers to learning and emotional support
  • Teaching approaches are focussed on addressing gaps in learning and building vocabulary
  • Training for adults supporting pupils in receipt of PPG
  • TA targeted interventions, resourcing targeted interventions e.g. Toe by toe, Stareway to Spelling, iPads, mathematics concrete resources
  • Pupils eligible for PPG has majority of 1:1 and small group support from the class teacher
  • Purchase of school uniform, sports kits and equipment, outdoor education clothing
  • Investment in CPOMS ( Child Protection Online Monitoring System )
  • Investment in ‘JIGSAW’ social and emotional programme
  • Rigorous monitoring of attendance and punctuality reported to governors
  • Forging strong links with parents e.g. induction packs for children, open evenings, school prospectus and booklets

 

Measuring the impact of PPG spending

In measuring the impact of our PPG spending, we will identify and evaluate the extent to which eligible pupils:

  • have built cultural capital and have a greater knowledge and understanding of the world around them and their place in it
  • have developed their language, literacy and communication skills
  • are reading at an age appropriate level
  • our success in diminishing gaps in general knowledge and skills
  • social and emotional needs are met
  • have high attendance and excellent punctuality
  • achieve and attain in line with non-eligible peers

 

Date of next review: July 2020